Crafting Your Resume Exactly How an Employer Demands

Fortunately, or unfortunately, prospective employers do judge candidates by their resume, and frequently make hiring decisions based solely on this document. Here at TAG, we present resumes accompanied by a personal questionnaire, so employers have an opportunity to get to know a great deal more about our candidates in addition to their career history.

That said, we have learned a few things over the years about required content, style and format that we thought would be worthwhile sharing.

Overview

The first thing to remember is that although your resume should be as succinct and informative as possible, it does not have to be crunched onto one page. The second thing to remember is that hiring programs HR Departments utilize are geared to pick up on specific words and phrases and automatically match them with open jobs. Do not put extra borders, colors, lines or drawings on your resume. We have seen all these things.

Objectives

Important – but keep it brief, and let them know the position(s) you are interested in.

Summary

You should neatly encapsulate your skills and experience. Bullet points are good, but not necessary. Again, keep it short and to the point.

Contact Information

You must put in your full address, personal email and cell phone. Your resume is automatically logged in to ever-increasingly sophisticated data mining programs. Failure to complete this section will render your resume worthless.

Accomplishments

Do not list your accomplishments separately. Employers need to see them in context. !

Work History

List your work history from your current job going back at least 10 years. State the name and city and state of your work place then the dates you worked there. If you worked at one company for a long time but at different jobs, please list that as one continuous job and your title at each position you held at the company. This will ensure you are not seen as a “job hopper”. The most important thing to list in your work experience is what you actually accomplished at your job. Everyone knows what your job entails. What you want to convey is:

• What were the circumstances when you were hired

• What did you do to effect change, what did you accomplish, and how – this is your opportunity !to present metrics and results, depending on your individual responsibilities

• What did you do to make/save the company money, and what you did to make the company better

References

Always include at least 3 – 5 references on your resume. Include their name, current title, email and best phone number. Also include how long you worked with them and your professional relationship with the person, as in what your interaction was with them when you worked together. Do not write “References Upon Request.” You should assume that references are always acted on.

Qualifications

Please list your education and degrees, licenses and affiliations together and make them short and sweet

In summary, do not over-complicate matters with anything other than the above. You will expand and embellish during your interview. But if you follow these simple guidelines, we are confident that we can advance you through the initial stages of the process.

Christopher MacIntyre is Managing General Partner at Talent Achievement Group, a Healthcare Recruiting Consultancy.  Contact Christopher @ christopher@tagachieve.com.  Follow us on Twitter @TAGachieve.